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Piercing Leviathan: God's Defeat of Evil in the Book of Job (New Studies In Biblical Theology Series)

Eric Ortlund

Paperback 2021-08-19

New Studies In Biblical Theology

Addressing key issues in biblical theology, the works comprised by New Studies in Biblical Theology are creative attempts to help Christians better understand their Bibles. The NSBT series is edited by D. A. Carson, aiming to simultaneously instruct and to edify, to interact with current scholarship and to point the way ahead.

New Studies in Biblical Theology volumes focus on three areas:

* the nature and status of biblical theology, including its relationship to other disciplines

* the articulation and exposition of the structure of thought from a particular biblical writer or text

* the delineation of a biblical theme across the biblical corpus

While volume notes interact with the best of recent research, the text of each work avoids untransliterated Greek and Hebrew or too much specialist jargon. The volumes are written within the framework of confessional evangelicalism, but they also engage a variety of other relevant viewpoints and significant literature.

This is a growing series and not yet complete. More volumes are forthcoming.

  • Publisher.

Publisher Description

' ... his hand pierced the fleeing serpent' (Job 26:13 ESV) One of the most challenging passages in the Old Testament book of Job comes in the Lord's second speech (chapters 40-41). The characters and the reader have waited a long time for the Lord to speak - only to receive what is traditionally interpreted as a long description of a hippopotamus and a crocodile (Behemoth and Leviathan). The stakes are very high. Is God right to run the world in such a way that allows such terrible suffering for one of his most loyal servants? Is Job right to keep trusting God in the midst of much criticism? It is difficult for modern readers to avoid a sense of frustrating anti-climax as the book concludes. Eric Ortlund argues that Behemoth and Leviathan are better understood as symbols of cosmic chaos and evil. A supernatural interpretation fits better exegetically within the book of Job and in its original context. It also helps us to appreciate the satisfying climax to the book: in describing Behemoth and Leviathan, God is directly engaging with Job's complaint about divine justice, implying that he understands the evil at loose in his creation better than Job does, that he is in control of it, and will one day destroy it.

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New Studies In Biblical Theology

Addressing key issues in biblical theology, the works comprised by New Studies in Biblical Theology are creative attempts to help Christians better understand their Bibles. The NSBT series is edited by D. A. Carson, aiming to simultaneously instruct and to edify, to interact with current scholarship and to point the way ahead.

New Studies in Biblical Theology volumes focus on three areas:

* the nature and status of biblical theology, including its relationship to other disciplines

* the articulation and exposition of the structure of thought from a particular biblical writer or text

* the delineation of a biblical theme across the biblical corpus

While volume notes interact with the best of recent research, the text of each work avoids untransliterated Greek and Hebrew or too much specialist jargon. The volumes are written within the framework of confessional evangelicalism, but they also engage a variety of other relevant viewpoints and significant literature.

This is a growing series and not yet complete. More volumes are forthcoming.

  • Publisher.

Publisher Description

' ... his hand pierced the fleeing serpent' (Job 26:13 ESV) One of the most challenging passages in the Old Testament book of Job comes in the Lord's second speech (chapters 40-41). The characters and the reader have waited a long time for the Lord to speak - only to receive what is traditionally interpreted as a long description of a hippopotamus and a crocodile (Behemoth and Leviathan). The stakes are very high. Is God right to run the world in such a way that allows such terrible suffering for one of his most loyal servants? Is Job right to keep trusting God in the midst of much criticism? It is difficult for modern readers to avoid a sense of frustrating anti-climax as the book concludes. Eric Ortlund argues that Behemoth and Leviathan are better understood as symbols of cosmic chaos and evil. A supernatural interpretation fits better exegetically within the book of Job and in its original context. It also helps us to appreciate the satisfying climax to the book: in describing Behemoth and Leviathan, God is directly engaging with Job's complaint about divine justice, implying that he understands the evil at loose in his creation better than Job does, that he is in control of it, and will one day destroy it.

Koorong Code586552
ISBN1789742986
EAN9781789742985
Pages248
DepartmentAcademic
CategoryBiblical Studies
Sub-CategoryOld Testament
PublisherApollos
Publication DateAug 2021
Dimensions21 x 139 x 216mm
Weight0.302kg